Traveling through the dark poem analysis. Analysis of Poem Through The by William Stafford 2019-01-09

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The Art of Travel Chapter 2: On Traveling Places Summary & Analysis from LitCharts

traveling through the dark poem analysis

The Wilson River Road, in which the events of the poem take place, is symbolic of the road of life that we all travel upon. Eventually, he pushes her over the edge into the river. Even though some choices might not make that much of a difference in the world, they can still affect us, and the things around us. So pushing onto river has vital value. This clearly indicates that the speaker holds no emotions whatsoever for the deer. But as he feels the warmth in its belly, he realizes that the animal is pregnant and its faun is still alive. The act of choosing may be solitary, but the context in which it occurs is not.

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On Through the

traveling through the dark poem analysis

Why does this poem appear to look like a sonnet? The physical in one, and the spiritual in the other. Schreber there is insert of a maze with a mouse trying to travel through it. Like the narrator s car staring toward the road, anxious about moving on, we all are eager to put these events behind us and continue on with life. By glow of the tail-light I stumbled back of the car and stood by the heap, a doe, a recent killing; she had stiffened already, almost cold. Finally he pushed the doe into the river.

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The Art of Travel Chapter 2: On Traveling Places Summary & Analysis from LitCharts

traveling through the dark poem analysis

The deer is actually dead on the edge of the Wilson River Road. Has he been this way before and found a run over animal? There is also personification in the final quatrain when the car aims its parking lights. It conveys the conditions of the accident. These ideas were much needed at the time of its first publication in 1855, ten years before the American Civil War. The car aimed ahead its lowered parking lights; under the hood purred the steady engine.

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening by Robert Frost

traveling through the dark poem analysis

Sorry, but copying text is forbidden on this website! The fawn could be intrepreted as the Jewish people. He thinks about the danger this deer can cause to. I stood in the glare of the warm exhaust turning red; around our group I could hear the wilderness listen. Precisely who is not doing the taking? Why does this poem appear to look like a sonnet? Stafford Poetry Foundation agenda angle-down angle-left angleRight arrow-down arrowRight bars calendar caret-down cart children highlight learningResources list mapMarker openBook p1 pin poetry-magazine print quoteLeft quoteRight slideshow tagAudio tagVideo teens trash-o. What Wordsworth himself said about the Ode: Intimations of Immortality, offers many clues for understanding what he is dealing with. Like the airplane, the service station is a traveling place between here and there, one that invites reflection by removing the traveler from any familiar location or social group: it is equally foreign for everyone passing through.


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The Art of Travel Chapter 2: On Traveling Places Summary & Analysis from LitCharts

traveling through the dark poem analysis

So killing those animals is like a crime!! The poet soon discovers the body of the doe, which has recently been killed and its body has become stiff and cold. The persona deduces that the accident. This last aspect is symbolized by the river in the poem that runs adjacent to the road. The deer turns out to be pregnant and this fact plays on the mind of the helper, who wants to keep the road safe yet cannot stop thinking about the fawn, still warm inside the mother. The most important symbol in the novel Heart of Darkness is darkness itself. In this poem, there are many conflicting themes between man and nature, actions and consequences. Stafford's somber scene is a small tragedy, but in his simplicity, in his directness without swerving, he creates a metaphor for life.

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William Stafford’s poem “Traveling Through The Dark” Essay Example for Free

traveling through the dark poem analysis

Humans seem to travel through life like a horse with blinders on, oblivious to the consequences or implications of their actions. It is the story of a man's solitary struggle to deal with a tragic event that he encounters. I felt the I was a convention, and not particularly apt. The dead dear symbolizes the sacrifices the wilderness had to make for technology. Both authors do a good job in making the audience feel an almost sympathy for the unborn fawn. Symbolism examples: The unborn fawn symbolizes lack of opportunities.

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Poem Analysis: Traveling through the Dark by William Stafford Essay

traveling through the dark poem analysis

Modern technology is tearing nature apart - what man relies on — if it continues perhaps the end for man could be through its own fault and creations. With its four quatrains and closing couplet, the poem resembles an extended sonnet and reads like one. It is usually best to roll them into the canyon: that road is narrow; to swerve might make more dead. And Stafford simply represents one form of that, where all the language dissolves as you're reading it. He even felt a cry in the wilds around him, which was the people who were getting restless to go ahead and they wanted the road to clear up as soon as possible. The Wilson River Road, in which the events of the poem take place, is symbolic of the road of life that we all travel upon. Could it have been saved? The simple truth is that everyone, regardless of whether they will admit it or not, needs people in their lives to have a full and enjoyable life.


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FREE Travelling Through the Dark Essay

traveling through the dark poem analysis

Stanza One The speaker informs the reader that a dead deer has been found, in the dark, on a narrow country road. I think that this poem is about making choices. But the clarity and simplicity of the poem are why people like it. Does it add to the meaning? As both articles suggest, there is a clear message in the poem about the intersection of man, nature, and technology. Richard Hugo This poem seems a great favorite of Stafford readers; it appears everywhere. This is just my interpretation of it. Copyright © 1976 by Louisiana State University Press.

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